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Ron Bowlds
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Fannie and Freddie Set Timeline Requirements for Short Sales

Posted by Ron Bowlds | on Friday, April 20th, 2012 at 11:29 am
Category: Avoid Foreclosure.
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Beginning June 15, real estate agents working with distressed homeowners whose loans are backed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac should expect to receive a decision on a short sale offer within 30-60 days.

The GSEs issued new guidelines Tuesday that fall under the Servicing Alignment Initiative rolled out last fall and aim to bring greater transparency to the short sale process and expedite decisions related to these pre-foreclosure sales.

Not only is a short sale an effective foreclosure alternative when home retention is no longer an option, but it keeps homes occupied and helps to maintain stable communities, according to the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA).

Addressing real estate practitioners’ No. 1 complaint about short sales, FHFA directed Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to establish a new uniform set of minimum response times that servicers must follow in order to facilitate more efficient short sale transactions.

The GSEs’ new short sale timelines require servicers to make a decision within 30 days of receiving either an offer on a property under the companies’ traditional short sale programs or a completed Borrower Response Package (BRP) requesting short sale consideration, whether it’s through the federal government’s Home Affordable Foreclosure Alternative (HAFA) program or a GSE program.

If more than 30 days are needed, servicers must provide the borrower with weekly status updates and come to a decision no later than 60 days from the date the BRP or offer was received.

According to the GSEs, this 30-day add-on will provide some leeway for servicers who may need more time to obtain a broker price opinion (BPO) or a private mortgage insurer’s approval for a short sale. All decisions must be made within 60 days.

In the event a servicer makes a counteroffer, the borrower is expected to respond within five business days. The servicer must then respond within 10 business days of receiving the borrower’s response.

The GSEs plan to use the new short sale timelines to evaluate servicer compliance with the Servicing Alignment Initiative.

Edward DeMarco, acting director of the FHFA, says the GSEs new borrower communication and timeline requirements for short sales “set minimum standards and provide clear expectations regarding these important foreclosure alternatives.”

GSE servicers must comply with the new minimum communication time frames for all short sale evaluations conducted on or after June 15, 2012, although servicers are encouraged to begin implementing the new requirements sooner.

“I applaud Fannie and Freddie for finally coming out with real guidance with real world timelines for their servicers,” commented Anthony Lamacchia, broker/owner of McGeough Lamacchia Realty Inc., which specializes in short sales. “There is no question that this will help short sales and the market as a whole.”

Last year Freddie Mac completed 45,623 short sales, a 140 percent increase since 2009. Fannie Mae’s short sale completions shot up by 101 percent over the same period, totaling around 79,800 in 2011.

Provided by DCNEWS.COM

Bottom Line

Slipping toward foreclosure can lead to feelings of anxiety, depression, and loss of self-esteem. Don’t give up. There are options available to help millions of homeowners rescue themselves from the brink. This represents only a summary of the solutions available to homeowners facing foreclosure. Since it is crucial to act before a foreclosure takes place, now is the most important time for you to contact a Real estate agent trained in pre-foreclosure tactics.

As a Certified Distressed Property Expert (CDPE), I am trained in assessing all foreclosure alternatives and pursuing the best solution for your own financial situation. I can provide more information and offer my services as a lifeline to those who want to take back hope for the future. When you are on the edge, you have no time to waste. Call me today; I’m here to lend a hand.

407-222-7022

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Short Sale vs. Foreclosure

Posted by Ron Bowlds | on Wednesday, November 16th, 2011 at 11:40 am
Category: Avoid Foreclosure.
Tags: , , , , , , ,
 ISSUE FORECLOSURE SUCCESSFUL SHORT SALE
Future Fannie Mae Loan

(Primary Residence)1

A homeowner who loses a home to foreclosure is ineligible for a Fannie Mae-backed mortgage for a period up to 7 years with some exceptions based on extenuating circumstances. See: efanniemae.com A homeowner who successfully negotiates and closes a short sale will be eligible for a Fannie Mae-backed mortgage within 2 years (see page 2 for LTV ratios).
Future Fannie Mae Loan

(Non Primary)2

An investor who loses a home to foreclosure is ineligible for a Fannie Mae backed mortgage for a period up to 7 years with some exceptions based on extenuating circumstances. See: efanniemae.com An investor who successfully negotiates and closes a short sale will be eligible for a Fannie Mae-backed investment mortgage within 2 years (see page two for LTV ratios).
Future Loan with any

Mortgage Company

On any future 1003 application, a prospective borrower will have to answer YES to question C in Section VIII of the standard 1003 that asks “Have you had property foreclosed upon or given title or deed-in-lieu thereof in the last 7 years?” This will affect future rates. There is no similar declaration or question regarding a short sale.

FHA – If current at the close of short sale, a homeowner may apply for an FHA loan immediately. If homeowner is late before close of short sale closing, will be eligible for FHA loan after 3 years.3

Credit Score Score may be lowered anywhere from 250 to over 300 points. Typically will affect score for over 3 years. Only late payments on mortgage will show, and after sale, mortgage is normally reported as “paid as agreed,” “paid as negotiated,” or “settled.” This can lower the score as little as 50 points if all other payments are being made. A short sale’s effect can be as brief as 12 to 18 months.
Credit History Foreclosure will remain as a public record on a person’s credit history for 7 years or more. A short sale is not reported on a persons credit history. There is no specific reporting item for “short sale.” In most cases a loan is typically reported “paid in full, settled” or “paid as negotiated.”
Security Clearances Foreclosure is the most challenging issue against a security clearance outside of a conviction of a serious misdemeanor or felony. If a client has a foreclosure and is a police or security officer, in the military, in the CIA, or any other position that requires a security clearance in almost all cases clearance will be revoked and position will be terminated. On its own, a short sale does not challenge most security clearances.4
Current Employment Employers have the right and are actively checking the credit regularly of all employees who are in sensitive positions. A foreclosure in many cases is ground for immediate reassignment or termination. A short sale is not reported on a credit report and is therefore not a challenge to employment.5
Future Employment Many employers are requiring credit checks on all job applicants. A foreclosure is one of the most detrimental credit items an applicant can have and in most cases will challenge employment. A short sale is not reported on a credit report and is therefore not a challenge to employment.6
Deficiency Judgment In 100% of foreclosures (except in those states where there is no deficiency) the bank has the right to pursue a deficiency judgment. In some successful short sales it is possible to convince the lender to give up the right to pursuit a deficiency judgment against the homeowner.
Deficiency Judgment

(amount)

In a foreclosure the home will have to go through an REO process if it does not sell at auction. In most cases this will result in a lower sales price and longer time to sale in a declining market. This will result in a higher possible deficiency judgment. In a properly managed short sale the home is sold at a price that should be close to market value and in almost all cases will be better than an REO sale resulting in a lower deficiency.

 

Page 2

Derogatory Event Fannie Mae Waiting Period Requirements Waiting Period with Extenuating Circumstances
Foreclosure 7 Years 3 Years

• Additional requirements after 3 years up to 7 years

• 90% maximum LTV ratios

• Purchase, principal residence

Short Sale 2 Years – 80% maximum LTV ratios

4 Years – 90% maximum LTV ratios

7 Years – LTV ratios per the Lender Eligibility Matrix

2 Years – 90% maximum LTV ratios
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10 Options to Avoid Foreclosure

Posted by Ron Bowlds | on Wednesday, November 16th, 2011 at 10:40 am
Category: Avoid Foreclosure.
Tags: , , , , , , ,

1. Short Sale

A short sale allows the homeowner to avoid foreclosure, minimize financial damage and move on from a burdensome, unaffordable mortgage. In many cases, a short sale allows the borrower to qualify for a new mortgage in just 24 months, as opposed to five years or more after a foreclosure. A trained real estate agent can negotiate a short sale with your lender if you have three qualifications. First, you must show some type of financial hardship. Second, you must have a monthly shortfall, meaning your monthly expenses are greater than your monthly income. Finally, you need to prove that your debts are greater than the value of your assets (certain investments, property, etc.).

 

2. Reinstatement

A reinstatement is the simplest solution for a foreclosure, however it is often the most difficult for homeowners to achieve. The homeowner simply pays the total amount past due (including late fees) to the lender. This solution does not require the lender’s approval and will “reinstate” a mortgage up to the day before the foreclosure sale.

 

3. Forbearance or Repayment Plan

A forbearance or repayment plan involves negotiating with the mortgage company to allow the homeowner to repay back-payments over a period of time. The homeowner typically makes current mortgage payments in addition to a portion of the back-payments owed. This option requires lender approval.

 

4. Mortgage Modification

A mortgage modification involves the reduction of one of the following: the interest rate on the loan, the principal balance of the loan, the term of the loan, or any combination of these. These changes require lender approval and typically result in a lower payment for the homeowner and a more affordable mortgage.

 

5. Rent the Property

This option does not require lender approval, but does require the homeowner’s ability to rent the house for enough money to cover the monthly mortgage payment. It is important to remember that there may be unexpected costs associated with the maintenance of a rental property in addition to the monthly mortgage payments. Homeowners should take this into consideration when deciding whether this option will work for them.

6. Deed-in-Lieu of Foreclosure

Also known as a “friendly foreclosure,” a deed-in-lieu allows the homeowner to return the property to the lender rather than go through the foreclosure process. Lender approval is required for this option, and the homeowner must also vacate the property. Deed-in-lieu can potentially lessen the damage to a credit score and future loan eligibility, and sometimes the lender will forgo their right to pursue a deficiency judgment, meaning the homeowner will not be responsible for further payments.

 

7. Bankruptcy

Many have considered and marketed bankruptcy as a “foreclosure solution,” but this is only true in some states and situations. This does not require lender approval, but you must have non-mortgage debts that you claim as a hardship. Entering bankruptcy can be a risky and costly process. Be sure to seek the advice of a qualified bankruptcy attorney when pursuing this as an option.

 

8. Refinance

As opposed to mortgage modification, refinancing means you will be acquiring a new loan based on your current credit standing. If you have already missed mortgage payments, your credit score may make it difficult to find a loan with cheaper payments.

 

9. Servicemembers Civil Relief Act

(military personnel only)

If a member of the military is experiencing financial distress due to deployment—and that person can show that the debt was entered into prior to deployment—he or she may qualify for relief under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act. The American Bar Association has a network of attorneys that will work with servicemembers to help qualify them for this relief.

 

10. Sell the Property

Homeowners with sufficient equity can list their property with a qualified agent who understands the foreclosure process in their area. Unfortunately, many homeowners in today’s market have experienced a decline in home value and may owe more than what the home is worth.

Bottom Line

Slipping toward foreclosure can lead to feelings of anxiety, depression, and loss of self-esteem. Don’t give up. There are options available to help millions of homeowners rescue themselves from the brink. This represents only a summary of the solutions available to homeowners facing foreclosure. Since it is crucial to act before a foreclosure takes place, now is the most important time for you to contact a Real estate agent trained in pre-foreclosure tactics.

As a Certified Distressed Property Expert (CDPE), I am trained in assessing all foreclosure alternatives and pursuing the best solution for your own financial situation. I can provide more information and offer my services as a lifeline to those who want to take back hope for the future. When you are on the edge, you have no time to waste. Call me today; I’m here to lend a hand.

407-222-7022

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5 Great Reasons to Sell Your House Today

Posted by Ron Bowlds | on Wednesday, September 7th, 2011 at 8:50 am
Category: Selling a home.
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

We are often asked “Is it time to sell my home?” The answer to that question is based on what your families’ goals are. If you don’t need or want to move for a few years it might make sense to wait for the housing industry to recover and prices to appreciate. However, if you wish to move within the next six to eighteen months, it is probably better to sell sooner rather than later. Here are five reasons why:

Your House Will Get More Exposure Now Than the Winter

Housing sales usually level off in the summer and then regain momentum in September and October. The spring buyers’ market has passed. Don’t miss the early fall market. It has consistently outperformed the winter season.

Distressed Properties Will Impact Prices

Distressed properties (foreclosures and short sales) on the market will increase this fall and winter. This will put tremendous downward pressure on prices for at least the next 12-18 months. Get your home sold before they become your competition.

Mortgages Will Become More Difficult to Attain

Lending standards are continuing to tighten. There is legislation currently being considered that will make it even harder for buyers to qualify. Less demand will equate to lower prices.

It is the Perfect Time to Move-Up

With prices where they are and interest rates at all time lows, there may have never been a better time to move-up into your dream home. If you move into a more desirable home now, you will be in position to gain larger equity as prices eventually appreciate.

You Get to Move On with Your Life

Probably the most important reason to sell is so you can get on with your life. You are considering selling for a reason. Do not allow a less-than-stellar housing market prevent you from reaching your goals as an individual or as a family. Think about the reasons you are thinking about moving. Are these reasons really important to you? If you have to take less than you were originally hoping to get for your house, your family has a question to ask each other: Is the dollar difference in sales price worth putting off our plans? Only you and your family know the answer to that question

by The KCM Crew

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Homeownership: Still the American Dream

Posted by Ron Bowlds | on Wednesday, August 17th, 2011 at 10:12 am
Category: Buy a House, Homes, Housing Market, Uncategorized.
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Yesterday, Fannie Mae released their National Housing Survey for the second quarter of 2011. They survey the American public on a multitude of questions concerning today’s housing market. Each quarter, we like to pull out some of the findings we deem most interesting. Here they are for the most recent report:

Most Important Reasons to Buy a Home

When we talk about homeownership today, it seems that the financial aspects always jump to the front of the discussion. However, the study shows that the four major reasons a person buys a home have nothing to do with money. The top four reasons, in order, are:

  • It means having a good place to raise children and provide them with a good education
  • You have a physical structure where you and your family feel safe
  • It allows you to have more space for your family
  • It gives you control of what you do with your living space (renovations and updates)

The Home as an Investment

Though most people purchase a home for non-financial reasons, everyone realizes there is a money component to homeownership. Here is what they said on this issue:

  • 65% of the general population (and 67% of homeowners) believe that homeownership is a ‘safe’ investment.
  • 56% believe that homeownership has more potential as an investment than any other traditional asset class.
  • 69% think that now is a good time to buy a home (this number has increased in each of the last two quarters)

Rent vs. Buy

We are always interested in the difference people see in renting vs. owning.

  • 63% of renters have aspirations to someday own their own home
  • 72% of renters think that owning is superior to renting
  • 95% of homeowners see homeownership as a positive experience (4% see it as a negative experience) while 82% of renters see renting as a positive experience (17% see it as a negative experience)
  • 96% of homeowners live in a single family residence while 46% of renters live in a multi-unit building

Bottom Line

Even in difficult times, Americans still realize the value of homeownership

by The KCM Crew

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How To Make An Offer that Will Be Accepted

Posted by Ron Bowlds | on Wednesday, June 1st, 2011 at 7:07 am
Category: Contract issues.
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

You have finally found the house of your dreams. It is priced right and is receiving a lot of attention from other buyers. You don’t want to miss this opportunity so you are ready to put in an offer with the real estate agent immediately. What can you do to guarantee your offer is the one accepted? Financially, offers can be broken down into three categories:

1.) An All-Cash Offer

Obviously, a cash purchaser is always favored by any seller. In today’s real estate market, an all-cash offer is even more enticing. Last month, one in four real estate transactions were impacted by a low appraisal. An all-cash buyer eliminates the need for the bank appraisal.

2.) A Non-Contingency Offer

If you don’t have the cash reserves for an all-cash purchase, the next best thing would be to make a non-contingency offer. To do this you should be already pre-approved for a mortgage and have your current house already in contract. This gives the seller the confidence that you are already a qualified buyer who will be able to complete the purchase.

3.) A Contingency Offer

Some buyers start the process of looking for a new home before their current home is sold. This could be a big mistake. If you find the home you were hoping for (perfect for your family AND priced right), it will be very difficult to get your offer accepted because you are not actually qualified to buy.

Asking a seller to wait for your home to sell is somewhat unreasonable in today’s environment. One of the reasons you would want the home is because the seller priced the home at a value to sell it NOW. They want to know it is sold when they accept an offer. They normally will not even entertain a contingency offer. 

Bottom Line

Unless you have the ability to purchase with cash, the best thing to do is to be pre-approved for a mortgage and have your current house already in contract before looking for the home of your dreams. That helps to guarantee you will get the home you love at a price that makes sense.

by The KCM Crew

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5 Reasons You Should Consider Selling Now

Posted by Ron Bowlds | on Tuesday, May 24th, 2011 at 2:19 pm
Category: Selling a home.
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

If you plan on moving anytime in 2011, you should strongly consider selling your house now rather than waiting. Here are five reasons why:

1.) This is when your house will get the most exposure 

The spring, and particularly the month of May, is when most buyers enter the real estate market. This surge of buyers dramatically increases the exposure for your house . The best chance of getting quality offers (perhaps even multiple offers) is RIGHT NOW!

2.) Foreclosures and short sales will increase in about 90 days

The good news is that the number of people paying their mortgage on time is increasing. This will lead to less distressed property sales later this year and throughout 2012. The not-so-good news is that there is still a large inventory of existing foreclosures and short sales that will still be coming to market.

As an example, LPS reported in their latest Mortgage Monitor that:

  • There are still twice as many loans going 90+ days delinquent as are starting foreclosure
  • There are almost three times the number of foreclosure starts as there are foreclosure sales
  • Distressed property inventory levels are almost 45 times the rate of monthly foreclosure sales 

This means that there is a backlog of properties which will start coming to the market in about 90 days as banks clear up their paperwork challenges. These properties sell at dramatic discounts. They will be your competition. Both Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have recently discussed the magnitude of this challenge.

3.) Interest rates have risen over the last six months

Interest rates have stabilized recently. However, in the last six months, interest rates have climbed over 1/2%. Every time the rates increase 1/4%, approximately 250,000 buyers are eliminated from qualifying for a mortgage. In an environment of volatile rates, waiting could mean that there will be fewer buyers eligible to purchase your house. It also could mean that you will pay a higher rate on the next home you buy.

4.) Qualifying for a mortgage is about to get even more difficult

Besides increasing rates, there are other factors that will hinder a buyer’s ability to qualify for a mortgage as we move forward. Lending standards have been getting tighter over the last year. And as the government debates the new proposed guidelines, banks are gearing up for even more stringent standards.

Morgan Stanley recently stated:

“Recent developments in issues such as GSE reform, Dodd-Frank securitization rules, and foreclosure settlement issues suggest a tighter and more expensive environment for mortgage credit.” 

This may impact any potential purchaser for your property and may also impact your next purchase.

5.) It’s time to get on with your life 

Probably the most important reason to sell is so you can get on with your life. You placed your home on the market for a reason. Do not allow a less-than-stellar housing market prevent you from reaching your goals as an individual or as a family. Think about the reasons you decided to move in the first place. Are these reasons still important to you? If you have to take less than you were originally hoping to get for your house, your family has a question to ask each other: Is the dollar difference in sales price worth putting off our plans? Only you and your family know the answer to that question.

Bottom Line 

If you plan to sell this year, the reasons above prove that selling now makes more sense than waiting to later in the year. Call me today to fully understand your best option.

by The KCM Crew

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Getting more from your income to qualify with

Posted by Ron Bowlds | on Thursday, May 12th, 2011 at 7:31 am
Category: Mortgages.
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

When it comes to qualifying for a loan the most prominent thing you hear about is debt-to-income ratio.  Well what does that mean anyway? Most often it is the sum of the monthly payment on the new mortgage, plus property taxes, homeowners insurance and other debt payments (Debt payments that extend beyond the next six months ,credit card debt, student loans, and alimony and child support payments, etc.), divided by income. The maximum debt-to-income ratio ranges from 40 percent to 43 percent, but underwriters can use discretion to accept higher requirements.

So how could you get underwriters to accept a higher percent? Well there are ways to make your existing income count for more. Claim pay above your base pay, investment returns, or any extra income.

  • If you work overtime, receive a commission, or have bonus incentives, document that you have received it for two years, along with a statement from your employer that it will likely continue.
  • If you have any part-time income that could be counted.
  • If you have investment income that you believe to be stable, put your reasons in writing along with data on investment performance.
  • If you are in the military and want to claim pay above base pay for your rank (jump, hazard, special assignment, etc.), and/or housing, base and food allowances, provide an explanation of why they will continue. If you are deployed, explain in writing that your pay stubs do not match your W-2s because you have been deployed to a war zone and that your income is not taxed.
  • If your income has recently increased, obtain a written statement from your employer explaining the reason for the increase and that it is likely to continue.
  •  If your income has recently decreased, obtain a written statement from your employer explaining the reason for the decrease and why it is likely to be temporary.
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Orlando’s Median price increases as “normal” home sales jump 28 percent

Posted by Ron Bowlds | on Wednesday, May 4th, 2011 at 12:13 pm
Category: Appraisal.
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

(April 14, 2011 – Orlando, FL) The median price of Orlando area existing-home sales has increased for the second consecutive month – to $103,000 – reports the Orlando Regional REALTOR® Association. However, the March 2011 median price is 6.36 percent less than the median recorded in March 2010.
The increase in overall median price is attributable in part to an increase in the number of “normal” home sales, which have higher selling prices than foreclosures or short sales. The number of normal sales in March (733) is 28.15 percent higher than in February (572).
“Short sales and foreclosures continue to dominate and account for 70.50 percent of sales in March,” says ORRA Chairman of the Board Mike McGraw, McGraw Real Estate Services, PL. “A consistently high percentage of these sales types is something that we want to see; the sooner they flush through the system the sooner we can get back to a market based on normal sales.”
For detailed statistical reports, please visit www.orlrealtor.com and click on “Housing Statistics” on the top menu bar.

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Concerns over home Rental Costs

Posted by Ron Bowlds | on Wednesday, April 27th, 2011 at 9:17 am
Category: Rent.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

We are often asked whether it is better to rent or buy in the current housing market. The answer to that question is: “It all depends”. There are certain situations where renting short term probably makes sense. It may make sense if you are retiring to a different region of the country and are not yet sure where you want to set down roots for the next 25 years. It may make sense if you have a one year employment contract which will probably require a move to another place upon termination.

However, in most other cases, renting right now makes little sense for several reasons.

  • Even though prices may still soften, waiting to buy makes no sense as the cost of owning a home may still increase.
  • Mortgages may soon become much more expensive than they are right now.
  • Owning a home is less expensive than renting a home in 72% of major U.S. cities.
  • Rental costs are about to explode.

Let’s take a closer look at the last reason. We have often said that the cost of anything is based on supply and demand. The number of widgets for sale and the number of widget buyers together create the price for widgets. That will also apply to rents. There is a much larger demand for rentals right now. The economy has forced many to leave their foreclosed homes and other buyers are afraid to plunge into homeownership.

At the same time, the supply of rentals is rapidly decreasing. Here is a graph from Calculated Risk showing the apartment vacancy rate in the United States:

                                               

When supply is rapidly decreasing and demand is quickly increasing, prices have only one place to go – and that is UP! That is exactly where rental prices are headed.

Bottom Line

Is now a good time to rent? We think not. You can buy a home today at a discounted price and get a 30 year mortgage at a historically low interest rate. You can set your housing expense for the next thirty years. On the other hand, rental costs are poised to increase for years to come.

by The KCM Crew

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